OFF THE BEATEN PATH TOUR OF FLORENCE

Travel off the beaten path of Florence and marvels at its hidden gems. Join our our expert local guide and discover the magnitude of Florence’s power.

PALAZZO DAVANZATI: TRAVEL BACK TO THE MIDDLE-AGES

During our Off the Beaten Path Tour of Florence you will be first guided inside Palazzo Davanzati, one of the very few medieval private houses survived to the heavy demolitions occurred in the city during the nineteenth century. Among the other things you will see the famous Room of the Parrots, with its fascinating walls completely covered in frescoes, designed to resemble
tapestry wall hangings, and decorated with small painted parrots all over. Part of the original collection was sold by the previous owner during the World War I in two New York auctions, which actually contributed to make the Florentine Medieval style known in the States.

VISIT THE ELEGANT PALAZZO MEDICI-RICCARDI

Your guide will then escort you to Palazzo Medici-Riccardi. In 1445 Cosimo de Medici, of the Medici family, the powerful Florentine family who ruled over Florence for centuries, decided to build his new house. The first project, prepared by Brunelleschi, also architect of the famous cupola of Santa Croce Church, was rejected for being too luxurious, and for Cosimo’s fear that it would arise the envy of his fellow citizens. The project was then assigned to Michelozzo de Bartolomeo, who completed his work by happily conjugating medieval tradition (grained sandstone) and new Renaissance concepts. The result is a building at once elegant and austere, and one of the most fascinating examples Florentine architecture. Art exhibitions are often held inside the palazzo.

HISTORY AND POLITICS UNFOLDS INSIDE PALAZZO VECCHIO

Our Off-Path Florence Tour will end with a visit to the museum of Palazzo Vecchio built in 1299 and intended to the be the seat of the government. Important artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Arnolfo di Cambio, Giorgio Vasari, and such figures as Savonarola were imprisoned in its tower. Palazzo Vecchio became the temporary seat of the Italian government between 1265—1271, during the long process of unification of the country. It is thus not just a place of fundamental importance for Italian culture but also for its political history.